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Aga Khan University launch Pakistan’s first health think-tank

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Karachi: (PR) Aga Khan University (AKU) health professionals have launched a new think-tank “AKUPI-NCD” in collaboration with experts from a variety of sectors.

According to World Health organization (WHO), Pakistan is lagging far behind to tackle the long lasting consequences of non-communicable diseases.

Pakistan’s leading cause of death and poor quality of life is not other than Non-Communicable Diseases.

NCD are basically a set of enduring illnesses such as cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, cancer, diabetes and mental disorders that are mainly caused by looming environmental factors such as pollution and sprawl.

Approximately 80 million Pakistanis are living with one or more NCDs.

Aga khan University, Professor Zainab Samad, stated that “NCDs aren’t a problem for the healthcare sector alone. These diseases have complex causes and long-lasting consequences and their costs to society extend far beyond lost productivity and stunted economic growth.”

NEWS DESK
NEWS DESKhttp://thinktank.pk
News Desk, where most of the News Item edit for THE THINK TANK JOURNAL editor@thinktank.pk

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